Roku Express

$29.88

Product is rated as #6 in category Media Streamers
Design6
EcoSystem9
Features6
Performance7
Value10

Roku Express | Easy High Definition (HD) Streaming Media Player. Quick, simple and less expensive than the competition, the Roku Express is the perfect basic streamer.

$29.88

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Roku Express | Easy High Definition (HD) Streaming Media Player

8.2Expert Score

Roku Express | Easy High Definition (HD) Streaming Media Player. Quick, simple and less expensive than the competition, the Roku Express is the perfect basic streamer.

Design
6
EcoSystem
9
Features
6
Performance
7
Value
10
PROS
  • The Roku Express is ultra-affordable, easy to use and packed with streaming apps. Unlike last year, it loads menus, apps, and videos quickly.
CONS
  • The menus can seem dated compared to rivals, and some apps use old-school layouts.

Specification: Roku Express

Brand Name

Item Weight (ounces)

9.9

Product Dimensions

3.3 x 1.4 x 1 inches

Item model number

Roku Express 3900R

Batteries

2 AAA batteries required. (included)

Color Name

Number of Component Outputs

8 reviews for Roku Express

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  1. Amazon Customer

    Fantastic product so far! After the first week, we bought a second one for a family member.First thing: Before you buy, understand what content is free and what is not. Second, in case it’s not obvious, the Roku operates over your wifi and internet connection. You have to have an internet connection that is fast enough to stream video. If you can’t stream video on your mobile (via wifi) or PC, you won’t be able to stream it on the Roku either.Subscription content: Anything that you have to pay for elsewhere (like Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, network TV streaming, etc), you’ll still have to have those same subscriptions. But the Roku allows you to access all of those subscriptions (the ones you’re paying for) from a single device on your TV, with a nice interface that nearly anyone can use, even if they’re technology-illiterate. Worst case, if you get lost somewhere, just press the Home button. (But keep in mind, each ‘channel’ on Roku is an app written by the individual content provider, so some are a little more complicated than others. I suspect for marketing reasons, it’s not always obvious on some of the network TV channels which content is free versus paid until you try to play it. But you’ll always be prompted before paying for anything, and you can add a pin-number to prevent accidental purchases).Ad-supported content: There is a lot of ad-supported content, just like watching free over-the-air (OTA) TV stations. For network TV (ABC, NBC, CBS, CW, etc), check each network’s website to see what shows you can watch for free directly on their website, and that’s generally what you’ll be able to watch on Roku, too. After all, the ‘channels’ on Roku are apps written by each network. For many networks, the free content includes the last 3 to 5 episodes of things that are currently airing, with content being made available a week after the original broadcast date. This is comes in handy if you miss an episode or two of over-the-air TV. Some of the networks also offer free ‘throwback’ content, where you can watch an entire series of an older show. And there are a few channels like pluto.tv and tubi.tv that provide a wide assortment of ad-supported movies and TV shows. Again, check their corresponding websites to see what content they currently have, and that’s what you’ll get on Roku. The ones mentioned above offer some relatively recent content, in addition to a lot of older and slightly-older content.Free, without ads: Mostly, you’ll find that the ad-free content is extremely old… lots of black-and-white TV and movies, some early color TV/movies, etc. For those who don’t like much of what’s on TV these days, there’s a lot of classy and classic stuff here. And, of course, a lot of b- and c-grade stuff you’ve never heard of.This newest version of the Roku Express (“5X more powerful”) has a very smooth interface, with good response from the remote. Video startup is extremely fast if you have decent internet speed. I tested on a relative’s 6mbps DSL internet, and buffering times were never uncomfortable. On my faster internet (100mbps), videos either start instantly, or take no more than about 1 or 2 seconds of buffering.The remote control is great — simple, strong signal, good range. It’s infrared-based, so you have to be in the same room (why would you want to be out of the room??). I generally don’t even have to point the remote at the Roku box, because the infrared is strong enough to reflect off of the ceiling or walls and still work. Just be sure your Roku box’s front side is unobscured and pointing toward the room. They provide a sticky-tape strip to stick the box somewhere convenient, like the side or top of your TV or media cabinet. The provided HDMI cable is only 2 feet long, though, so it does have to be relatively close to the TV. But you could use a different HDMI cable if you need the remote to be a little farther away. One feature I love about the remote is that pressing the Home button will turn on your TV and switch to the Roku’s HDMI input, assuming your TV supports this (I have a Samsung TV which is supported, and a TCL TV which apparently wasn’t).You can also use the Roku app on your mobile to control the Roku via wifi. In addition to providing an interface that looks pretty similar to the physical remote, you can also browse for other content while something is already playing. It fact, it’s quite a bit easier to navigate if you’re searching for something specific, since the physical remote requires using an on-screen keyboard where you select each letter and click OK (normally, I’m not searching for something specific on the physical remote, so it’s not a problem). The app also has a headphone feature, which I’m guessing allows you to listen directly from your mobile instead of via the TV… great for watching at night when others are sleeping. Note, the Roku app is NOT designed to watch Roku content directly on your mobile. It simply lets you select the content to watch on the TV.Overall, it’s a great experience. My only subscription at the moment is Amazon prime, which doesn’t have a lot of content that I really want to watch (sorry, Amazon! I have Prime mostly for the shipping), so I use the Roku mostly for ad-supported TV and movies, and there’s more than enough to keep me busy for a long time.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  2. Amazon Customer

    Fantastic product so far! After the first week, we bought a second one for a family member.First thing: Before you buy, understand what content is free and what is not. Second, in case it’s not obvious, the Roku operates over your wifi and internet connection. You have to have an internet connection that is fast enough to stream video. If you can’t stream video on your mobile (via wifi) or PC, you won’t be able to stream it on the Roku either.Subscription content: Anything that you have to pay for elsewhere (like Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, network TV streaming, etc), you’ll still have to have those same subscriptions. But the Roku allows you to access all of those subscriptions (the ones you’re paying for) from a single device on your TV, with a nice interface that nearly anyone can use, even if they’re technology-illiterate. Worst case, if you get lost somewhere, just press the Home button. (But keep in mind, each ‘channel’ on Roku is an app written by the individual content provider, so some are a little more complicated than others. I suspect for marketing reasons, it’s not always obvious on some of the network TV channels which content is free versus paid until you try to play it. But you’ll always be prompted before paying for anything, and you can add a pin-number to prevent accidental purchases).Ad-supported content: There is a lot of ad-supported content, just like watching free over-the-air (OTA) TV stations. For network TV (ABC, NBC, CBS, CW, etc), check each network’s website to see what shows you can watch for free directly on their website, and that’s generally what you’ll be able to watch on Roku, too. After all, the ‘channels’ on Roku are apps written by each network. For many networks, the free content includes the last 3 to 5 episodes of things that are currently airing, with content being made available a week after the original broadcast date. This is comes in handy if you miss an episode or two of over-the-air TV. Some of the networks also offer free ‘throwback’ content, where you can watch an entire series of an older show. And there are a few channels like pluto.tv and tubi.tv that provide a wide assortment of ad-supported movies and TV shows. Again, check their corresponding websites to see what content they currently have, and that’s what you’ll get on Roku. The ones mentioned above offer some relatively recent content, in addition to a lot of older and slightly-older content.Free, without ads: Mostly, you’ll find that the ad-free content is extremely old… lots of black-and-white TV and movies, some early color TV/movies, etc. For those who don’t like much of what’s on TV these days, there’s a lot of classy and classic stuff here. And, of course, a lot of b- and c-grade stuff you’ve never heard of.This newest version of the Roku Express (“5X more powerful”) has a very smooth interface, with good response from the remote. Video startup is extremely fast if you have decent internet speed. I tested on a relative’s 6mbps DSL internet, and buffering times were never uncomfortable. On my faster internet (100mbps), videos either start instantly, or take no more than about 1 or 2 seconds of buffering.The remote control is great — simple, strong signal, good range. It’s infrared-based, so you have to be in the same room (why would you want to be out of the room??). I generally don’t even have to point the remote at the Roku box, because the infrared is strong enough to reflect off of the ceiling or walls and still work. Just be sure your Roku box’s front side is unobscured and pointing toward the room. They provide a sticky-tape strip to stick the box somewhere convenient, like the side or top of your TV or media cabinet. The provided HDMI cable is only 2 feet long, though, so it does have to be relatively close to the TV. But you could use a different HDMI cable if you need the remote to be a little farther away. One feature I love about the remote is that pressing the Home button will turn on your TV and switch to the Roku’s HDMI input, assuming your TV supports this (I have a Samsung TV which is supported, and a TCL TV which apparently wasn’t).You can also use the Roku app on your mobile to control the Roku via wifi. In addition to providing an interface that looks pretty similar to the physical remote, you can also browse for other content while something is already playing. It fact, it’s quite a bit easier to navigate if you’re searching for something specific, since the physical remote requires using an on-screen keyboard where you select each letter and click OK (normally, I’m not searching for something specific on the physical remote, so it’s not a problem). The app also has a headphone feature, which I’m guessing allows you to listen directly from your mobile instead of via the TV… great for watching at night when others are sleeping. Note, the Roku app is NOT designed to watch Roku content directly on your mobile. It simply lets you select the content to watch on the TV.Overall, it’s a great experience. My only subscription at the moment is Amazon prime, which doesn’t have a lot of content that I really want to watch (sorry, Amazon! I have Prime mostly for the shipping), so I use the Roku mostly for ad-supported TV and movies, and there’s more than enough to keep me busy for a long time.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  3. Amazon Customer

    Fantastic product so far! After the first week, we bought a second one for a family member.First thing: Before you buy, understand what content is free and what is not. Second, in case it’s not obvious, the Roku operates over your wifi and internet connection. You have to have an internet connection that is fast enough to stream video. If you can’t stream video on your mobile (via wifi) or PC, you won’t be able to stream it on the Roku either.Subscription content: Anything that you have to pay for elsewhere (like Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, network TV streaming, etc), you’ll still have to have those same subscriptions. But the Roku allows you to access all of those subscriptions (the ones you’re paying for) from a single device on your TV, with a nice interface that nearly anyone can use, even if they’re technology-illiterate. Worst case, if you get lost somewhere, just press the Home button. (But keep in mind, each ‘channel’ on Roku is an app written by the individual content provider, so some are a little more complicated than others. I suspect for marketing reasons, it’s not always obvious on some of the network TV channels which content is free versus paid until you try to play it. But you’ll always be prompted before paying for anything, and you can add a pin-number to prevent accidental purchases).Ad-supported content: There is a lot of ad-supported content, just like watching free over-the-air (OTA) TV stations. For network TV (ABC, NBC, CBS, CW, etc), check each network’s website to see what shows you can watch for free directly on their website, and that’s generally what you’ll be able to watch on Roku, too. After all, the ‘channels’ on Roku are apps written by each network. For many networks, the free content includes the last 3 to 5 episodes of things that are currently airing, with content being made available a week after the original broadcast date. This is comes in handy if you miss an episode or two of over-the-air TV. Some of the networks also offer free ‘throwback’ content, where you can watch an entire series of an older show. And there are a few channels like pluto.tv and tubi.tv that provide a wide assortment of ad-supported movies and TV shows. Again, check their corresponding websites to see what content they currently have, and that’s what you’ll get on Roku. The ones mentioned above offer some relatively recent content, in addition to a lot of older and slightly-older content.Free, without ads: Mostly, you’ll find that the ad-free content is extremely old… lots of black-and-white TV and movies, some early color TV/movies, etc. For those who don’t like much of what’s on TV these days, there’s a lot of classy and classic stuff here. And, of course, a lot of b- and c-grade stuff you’ve never heard of.This newest version of the Roku Express (“5X more powerful”) has a very smooth interface, with good response from the remote. Video startup is extremely fast if you have decent internet speed. I tested on a relative’s 6mbps DSL internet, and buffering times were never uncomfortable. On my faster internet (100mbps), videos either start instantly, or take no more than about 1 or 2 seconds of buffering.The remote control is great — simple, strong signal, good range. It’s infrared-based, so you have to be in the same room (why would you want to be out of the room??). I generally don’t even have to point the remote at the Roku box, because the infrared is strong enough to reflect off of the ceiling or walls and still work. Just be sure your Roku box’s front side is unobscured and pointing toward the room. They provide a sticky-tape strip to stick the box somewhere convenient, like the side or top of your TV or media cabinet. The provided HDMI cable is only 2 feet long, though, so it does have to be relatively close to the TV. But you could use a different HDMI cable if you need the remote to be a little farther away. One feature I love about the remote is that pressing the Home button will turn on your TV and switch to the Roku’s HDMI input, assuming your TV supports this (I have a Samsung TV which is supported, and a TCL TV which apparently wasn’t).You can also use the Roku app on your mobile to control the Roku via wifi. In addition to providing an interface that looks pretty similar to the physical remote, you can also browse for other content while something is already playing. It fact, it’s quite a bit easier to navigate if you’re searching for something specific, since the physical remote requires using an on-screen keyboard where you select each letter and click OK (normally, I’m not searching for something specific on the physical remote, so it’s not a problem). The app also has a headphone feature, which I’m guessing allows you to listen directly from your mobile instead of via the TV… great for watching at night when others are sleeping. Note, the Roku app is NOT designed to watch Roku content directly on your mobile. It simply lets you select the content to watch on the TV.Overall, it’s a great experience. My only subscription at the moment is Amazon prime, which doesn’t have a lot of content that I really want to watch (sorry, Amazon! I have Prime mostly for the shipping), so I use the Roku mostly for ad-supported TV and movies, and there’s more than enough to keep me busy for a long time.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  4. Amazon Customer

    Fantastic product so far! After the first week, we bought a second one for a family member.First thing: Before you buy, understand what content is free and what is not. Second, in case it’s not obvious, the Roku operates over your wifi and internet connection. You have to have an internet connection that is fast enough to stream video. If you can’t stream video on your mobile (via wifi) or PC, you won’t be able to stream it on the Roku either.Subscription content: Anything that you have to pay for elsewhere (like Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, network TV streaming, etc), you’ll still have to have those same subscriptions. But the Roku allows you to access all of those subscriptions (the ones you’re paying for) from a single device on your TV, with a nice interface that nearly anyone can use, even if they’re technology-illiterate. Worst case, if you get lost somewhere, just press the Home button. (But keep in mind, each ‘channel’ on Roku is an app written by the individual content provider, so some are a little more complicated than others. I suspect for marketing reasons, it’s not always obvious on some of the network TV channels which content is free versus paid until you try to play it. But you’ll always be prompted before paying for anything, and you can add a pin-number to prevent accidental purchases).Ad-supported content: There is a lot of ad-supported content, just like watching free over-the-air (OTA) TV stations. For network TV (ABC, NBC, CBS, CW, etc), check each network’s website to see what shows you can watch for free directly on their website, and that’s generally what you’ll be able to watch on Roku, too. After all, the ‘channels’ on Roku are apps written by each network. For many networks, the free content includes the last 3 to 5 episodes of things that are currently airing, with content being made available a week after the original broadcast date. This is comes in handy if you miss an episode or two of over-the-air TV. Some of the networks also offer free ‘throwback’ content, where you can watch an entire series of an older show. And there are a few channels like pluto.tv and tubi.tv that provide a wide assortment of ad-supported movies and TV shows. Again, check their corresponding websites to see what content they currently have, and that’s what you’ll get on Roku. The ones mentioned above offer some relatively recent content, in addition to a lot of older and slightly-older content.Free, without ads: Mostly, you’ll find that the ad-free content is extremely old… lots of black-and-white TV and movies, some early color TV/movies, etc. For those who don’t like much of what’s on TV these days, there’s a lot of classy and classic stuff here. And, of course, a lot of b- and c-grade stuff you’ve never heard of.This newest version of the Roku Express (“5X more powerful”) has a very smooth interface, with good response from the remote. Video startup is extremely fast if you have decent internet speed. I tested on a relative’s 6mbps DSL internet, and buffering times were never uncomfortable. On my faster internet (100mbps), videos either start instantly, or take no more than about 1 or 2 seconds of buffering.The remote control is great — simple, strong signal, good range. It’s infrared-based, so you have to be in the same room (why would you want to be out of the room??). I generally don’t even have to point the remote at the Roku box, because the infrared is strong enough to reflect off of the ceiling or walls and still work. Just be sure your Roku box’s front side is unobscured and pointing toward the room. They provide a sticky-tape strip to stick the box somewhere convenient, like the side or top of your TV or media cabinet. The provided HDMI cable is only 2 feet long, though, so it does have to be relatively close to the TV. But you could use a different HDMI cable if you need the remote to be a little farther away. One feature I love about the remote is that pressing the Home button will turn on your TV and switch to the Roku’s HDMI input, assuming your TV supports this (I have a Samsung TV which is supported, and a TCL TV which apparently wasn’t).You can also use the Roku app on your mobile to control the Roku via wifi. In addition to providing an interface that looks pretty similar to the physical remote, you can also browse for other content while something is already playing. It fact, it’s quite a bit easier to navigate if you’re searching for something specific, since the physical remote requires using an on-screen keyboard where you select each letter and click OK (normally, I’m not searching for something specific on the physical remote, so it’s not a problem). The app also has a headphone feature, which I’m guessing allows you to listen directly from your mobile instead of via the TV… great for watching at night when others are sleeping. Note, the Roku app is NOT designed to watch Roku content directly on your mobile. It simply lets you select the content to watch on the TV.Overall, it’s a great experience. My only subscription at the moment is Amazon prime, which doesn’t have a lot of content that I really want to watch (sorry, Amazon! I have Prime mostly for the shipping), so I use the Roku mostly for ad-supported TV and movies, and there’s more than enough to keep me busy for a long time.

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  5. Ace

    There are hundreds of reviews for this product, so rather than touching on what has already been said, let me just throw in some Do’s and Don’ts if you find yourself, like me, navigating the vast array of options in the streaming space.Do’s1) Do your research! There are several different models for Roku, depending on what YOU really need, want or want to pay. I bought a Roku Express because I was upgrading from a 1st generation Roku device and this one is (or at least feels) a thousand times faster, more powerful and has the upgraded software interfaces for apps like Netflix where you can manage your profiles – the older versions did not support that ability, it only presented your default profile.2) Use the power adapter that comes with it. Sure, you can plug it to your smartTV usb port for power, but if you read about this, there are tons of issues that stem from lack of power supply to the device.3) Think where you will place your device. This is NOT a set top box, this is a tiny (half of your hand palm) device that has a double tape and sticks do your TV. It is not invasive, it has nice black finish so it won’t ruin any aesthetics, but once you stick it on, you need to leave it there, otherwise you could end up with a tape that will no longer work, creating an extra hassle – think location first, then execute and paste it.4) Play around with it – it has lots of configuration options, like turning on your TV with 1 touch, casting your mobile screen, etc. If you go only by the default options you might miss some fun tricks!5) Match it with a good router/wifi setup. The worst you can do is have a nice TV, get the top of the line 4K enabled Roku and pair that to a sub-par WIFI connection or a provider that will not support your streaming needs. Remember! this is not plugged by cables, this device streams over the air radio waves, so the distance to your router, obstacles, speed of your network (not only download speeds, but actual WIFI band speeds) can all affect the outcome, so do your homework and think about your entertainment system as a whole, not just the TV / streaming portion.Dont’s1) Not everybody needs 4K streaming and NOT all providers support it! Many providers will charge premium for UHD Content and offer HD as standard option, if that is the case for you, spending extra $$ on a 4K TV and a 4K streaming device will be wasted. (again, see my last DO bullet item!)2) Let your expectations be unrealistic – Yes Roku provides tons of free content. Free means many of the channels are privately supported which means the content may not be UHD.3) The REAL Fun from roku comes when you enable the channels based on your paid content (netflix, hulu, amazon, premium networks like hbo, nfl, etc…) so if you want to really exploit your Roku’s capabilities you will have to pay at some point for prime content.I hope this helps – I am an early adopter of Roku, have major streaming services like Netflix, Prime and supplemented with an “a la carte” cable service like sling, spectrum choice, DirectTV now or any of your preferred providers and this will unlock all the major broadcast networks, plus some other channels.One last thought: The interest thing is that Roku has a channel for many of these major network stations and watching their content through the Roku channel as opposed through the cable provider app, I’ve found that there is more content outside, and better choices for on-demand.Hope you like my review!

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  6. Ace

    There are hundreds of reviews for this product, so rather than touching on what has already been said, let me just throw in some Do’s and Don’ts if you find yourself, like me, navigating the vast array of options in the streaming space.Do’s1) Do your research! There are several different models for Roku, depending on what YOU really need, want or want to pay. I bought a Roku Express because I was upgrading from a 1st generation Roku device and this one is (or at least feels) a thousand times faster, more powerful and has the upgraded software interfaces for apps like Netflix where you can manage your profiles – the older versions did not support that ability, it only presented your default profile.2) Use the power adapter that comes with it. Sure, you can plug it to your smartTV usb port for power, but if you read about this, there are tons of issues that stem from lack of power supply to the device.3) Think where you will place your device. This is NOT a set top box, this is a tiny (half of your hand palm) device that has a double tape and sticks do your TV. It is not invasive, it has nice black finish so it won’t ruin any aesthetics, but once you stick it on, you need to leave it there, otherwise you could end up with a tape that will no longer work, creating an extra hassle – think location first, then execute and paste it.4) Play around with it – it has lots of configuration options, like turning on your TV with 1 touch, casting your mobile screen, etc. If you go only by the default options you might miss some fun tricks!5) Match it with a good router/wifi setup. The worst you can do is have a nice TV, get the top of the line 4K enabled Roku and pair that to a sub-par WIFI connection or a provider that will not support your streaming needs. Remember! this is not plugged by cables, this device streams over the air radio waves, so the distance to your router, obstacles, speed of your network (not only download speeds, but actual WIFI band speeds) can all affect the outcome, so do your homework and think about your entertainment system as a whole, not just the TV / streaming portion.Dont’s1) Not everybody needs 4K streaming and NOT all providers support it! Many providers will charge premium for UHD Content and offer HD as standard option, if that is the case for you, spending extra $$ on a 4K TV and a 4K streaming device will be wasted. (again, see my last DO bullet item!)2) Let your expectations be unrealistic – Yes Roku provides tons of free content. Free means many of the channels are privately supported which means the content may not be UHD.3) The REAL Fun from roku comes when you enable the channels based on your paid content (netflix, hulu, amazon, premium networks like hbo, nfl, etc…) so if you want to really exploit your Roku’s capabilities you will have to pay at some point for prime content.I hope this helps – I am an early adopter of Roku, have major streaming services like Netflix, Prime and supplemented with an “a la carte” cable service like sling, spectrum choice, DirectTV now or any of your preferred providers and this will unlock all the major broadcast networks, plus some other channels.One last thought: The interest thing is that Roku has a channel for many of these major network stations and watching their content through the Roku channel as opposed through the cable provider app, I’ve found that there is more content outside, and better choices for on-demand.Hope you like my review!

    Helpful(0) Unhelpful(0)You have already voted this
  7. Ace

    There are hundreds of reviews for this product, so rather than touching on what has already been said, let me just throw in some Do’s and Don’ts if you find yourself, like me, navigating the vast array of options in the streaming space.Do’s1) Do your research! There are several different models for Roku, depending on what YOU really need, want or want to pay. I bought a Roku Express because I was upgrading from a 1st generation Roku device and this one is (or at least feels) a thousand times faster, more powerful and has the upgraded software interfaces for apps like Netflix where you can manage your profiles – the older versions did not support that ability, it only presented your default profile.2) Use the power adapter that comes with it. Sure, you can plug it to your smartTV usb port for power, but if you read about this, there are tons of issues that stem from lack of power supply to the device.3) Think where you will place your device. This is NOT a set top box, this is a tiny (half of your hand palm) device that has a double tape and sticks do your TV. It is not invasive, it has nice black finish so it won’t ruin any aesthetics, but once you stick it on, you need to leave it there, otherwise you could end up with a tape that will no longer work, creating an extra hassle – think location first, then execute and paste it.4) Play around with it – it has lots of configuration options, like turning on your TV with 1 touch, casting your mobile screen, etc. If you go only by the default options you might miss some fun tricks!5) Match it with a good router/wifi setup. The worst you can do is have a nice TV, get the top of the line 4K enabled Roku and pair that to a sub-par WIFI connection or a provider that will not support your streaming needs. Remember! this is not plugged by cables, this device streams over the air radio waves, so the distance to your router, obstacles, speed of your network (not only download speeds, but actual WIFI band speeds) can all affect the outcome, so do your homework and think about your entertainment system as a whole, not just the TV / streaming portion.Dont’s1) Not everybody needs 4K streaming and NOT all providers support it! Many providers will charge premium for UHD Content and offer HD as standard option, if that is the case for you, spending extra $$ on a 4K TV and a 4K streaming device will be wasted. (again, see my last DO bullet item!)2) Let your expectations be unrealistic – Yes Roku provides tons of free content. Free means many of the channels are privately supported which means the content may not be UHD.3) The REAL Fun from roku comes when you enable the channels based on your paid content (netflix, hulu, amazon, premium networks like hbo, nfl, etc…) so if you want to really exploit your Roku’s capabilities you will have to pay at some point for prime content.I hope this helps – I am an early adopter of Roku, have major streaming services like Netflix, Prime and supplemented with an “a la carte” cable service like sling, spectrum choice, DirectTV now or any of your preferred providers and this will unlock all the major broadcast networks, plus some other channels.One last thought: The interest thing is that Roku has a channel for many of these major network stations and watching their content through the Roku channel as opposed through the cable provider app, I’ve found that there is more content outside, and better choices for on-demand.Hope you like my review!

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  8. Ace

    There are hundreds of reviews for this product, so rather than touching on what has already been said, let me just throw in some Do’s and Don’ts if you find yourself, like me, navigating the vast array of options in the streaming space.Do’s1) Do your research! There are several different models for Roku, depending on what YOU really need, want or want to pay. I bought a Roku Express because I was upgrading from a 1st generation Roku device and this one is (or at least feels) a thousand times faster, more powerful and has the upgraded software interfaces for apps like Netflix where you can manage your profiles – the older versions did not support that ability, it only presented your default profile.2) Use the power adapter that comes with it. Sure, you can plug it to your smartTV usb port for power, but if you read about this, there are tons of issues that stem from lack of power supply to the device.3) Think where you will place your device. This is NOT a set top box, this is a tiny (half of your hand palm) device that has a double tape and sticks do your TV. It is not invasive, it has nice black finish so it won’t ruin any aesthetics, but once you stick it on, you need to leave it there, otherwise you could end up with a tape that will no longer work, creating an extra hassle – think location first, then execute and paste it.4) Play around with it – it has lots of configuration options, like turning on your TV with 1 touch, casting your mobile screen, etc. If you go only by the default options you might miss some fun tricks!5) Match it with a good router/wifi setup. The worst you can do is have a nice TV, get the top of the line 4K enabled Roku and pair that to a sub-par WIFI connection or a provider that will not support your streaming needs. Remember! this is not plugged by cables, this device streams over the air radio waves, so the distance to your router, obstacles, speed of your network (not only download speeds, but actual WIFI band speeds) can all affect the outcome, so do your homework and think about your entertainment system as a whole, not just the TV / streaming portion.Dont’s1) Not everybody needs 4K streaming and NOT all providers support it! Many providers will charge premium for UHD Content and offer HD as standard option, if that is the case for you, spending extra $$ on a 4K TV and a 4K streaming device will be wasted. (again, see my last DO bullet item!)2) Let your expectations be unrealistic – Yes Roku provides tons of free content. Free means many of the channels are privately supported which means the content may not be UHD.3) The REAL Fun from roku comes when you enable the channels based on your paid content (netflix, hulu, amazon, premium networks like hbo, nfl, etc…) so if you want to really exploit your Roku’s capabilities you will have to pay at some point for prime content.I hope this helps – I am an early adopter of Roku, have major streaming services like Netflix, Prime and supplemented with an “a la carte” cable service like sling, spectrum choice, DirectTV now or any of your preferred providers and this will unlock all the major broadcast networks, plus some other channels.One last thought: The interest thing is that Roku has a channel for many of these major network stations and watching their content through the Roku channel as opposed through the cable provider app, I’ve found that there is more content outside, and better choices for on-demand.Hope you like my review!

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